met-jobs@lists.reading.ac.uk
January 2018
Message 5

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[Met-jobs] PhD CASE funded Exeter-Met Office: Marine emissions and climate

From "Halloran, Paul" <P.Halloran@exeter.ac.uk>
To "Met-jobs@lists.reading.ac.uk" <Met-jobs@lists.reading.ac.uk>
Date Wed, 3 Jan 2018 10:58:40 +0000

This NERC CASE funded 4 year project is looking to appoint a talented, 
enthusiastic and numerically minded PhD student to work between the University 
of Exeter and Met Office from September 2018, to help improve our understanding 
of Southern Ocean climate.

A key natural marine aerosol (atmospheric particles) precursor is Dimethyl 
Sulphide (DMS), a gas produced through biological activity in the surface 
ocean. Natural background emissions of DMS were an important contributor to the 
total aerosol concentration in the pre-industrial era. How “dirty” our 
pre-industrial atmosphere was determines how sensitive our current climate 
system is to additional aerosol particles emitted by humans via activities such 
as power production agriculture (Carslaw et al., 2013). The state-of-the-art 
climate model, UKESM1, is being developed by the Met Office and UK scientific 
community. This model shows that the level of these pre-industrial emissions 
may have a big impact on how much our planet has warmed in response to 
industrialisation. We also hypothesise that these emissions may help explain 
why global climate models typically overestimate Southern Ocean surface 
temperatures.

We want to work with you to:
-       Develop novel climatologies of surface ocean DMS concentrations, 
carefully exploring potential uncertainties. To further this, there is the 
possibility of making new DMS measurements in the Southern Ocean to help fill 
gaps in our understanding.
-       Perform new climate model experiments at the Met Office, to quantify 
how sensitive our climate system, and particularly Southern Ocean surface 
temperatures, are to this DMS emission uncertainty.
-       Use this information to improve or explain the UK’s state-of-the-art 
climate simulations.

For details and to apply see:
http://www.exeter.ac.uk/studying/funding/award/?id=3009

If you have any questions, please contact Paul Halloran p.halloran@exeter.ac.uk 
or Jane Mulcahy jane.mulcahy@metoffice.gov.uk


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