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October 2014
Message 53

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[Met-jobs] Post-doctoral Research Associate at the University of Edinburgh (UK)

From "Roger Brugge" <r.brugge@reading.ac.uk>
To "met-jobs@lists.rdg.ac.uk" <met-jobs@lists.reading.ac.uk>
Date Tue, 14 Oct 2014 16:44:00 +0000

Forwarded from CLIMLIST...

We are looking for a Post-doctoral Research Associate who will use both
observed data and climate model data in order to determine how and why
the frequency and intensity of extreme temperatures has changed in the
past. Of particular interest are the 1930s and 40s, where many of the
record high temperatures in the US were set, but the goal of the project
is to understand the wider variability in regional temperature
distributions and its causes from the entire available record. Questions
include: how much does the occurrence of cold and hot spells vary from
decade to decade? How much of that change is due to external influences
on climate such as greenhouse gas increases or volcanic eruptions? Did
the North Atlantic ocean surface temperature or sea ice cover in the
Arctic affect the probability of hot summers or cold winters in the
past? To what extent are recent extreme events hotter /less cold then
similar extremes would have been earlier in the 20th century? What
caused the temperature records in the US in the early part of the 20th
century?

The post arises from the ERC advanced grant ‘Transition Into the
Antropocene’ (TITAN; Feb 2013-Jan 2018). The project aims at determining
the causes of climate change over the instrumental record, with
particular emphasis on the period prior to 1950. The project is
performed by a team analysing observed data for temperature,
precipitation, sea ice and extremes, and modelling the effect of
external drivers and sea surface temperature on climate with the purpose
of determining the role of external drivers, ocean surface conditions
and climate variability on observed changes and events in the
instrumental record.

The successful candidate should have a PhD in Geoscience, preferentially
in climate research; either already obtained or close to obtaining.
Quantitative analysis skills; computing experience e.g. matlab, IDL,
python are essential. Experience in analysing climate data from models
or observations; particularly, an understanding of the role of dynamics
and external drivers on climate variability and change is desirable.

This post is available from November 2014 (or a soon as possible
thereafter) and is fixed term for 24 month with the possibility of
extension.

For questions please contact Gabi Hegerl <gabi.hegerl@ed.ac.uk>, for
application please use this link:
<https://www.vacancies.ed.ac.uk/pls/corehrrecruit/erq_jobspec_version_4.jobspec?p_id=031535
 >
Closing Nov 3, 2014.




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