met-jobs@lists.reading.ac.uk
September 2012
Message 48

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[Met-jobs] Job Vacancy - Physical Oceanographer at the British Antarctic Survey (Cambridge)

From "Sallee, Jean-Baptiste B." <jbsall@bas.ac.uk>
To "climlist@wku.edu" <climlist@wku.edu>, "Met-jobs@lists.reading.ac.uk" <Met-jobs@lists.reading.ac.uk>, "MARINE-L-request@JISCMAIL.AC.UK" <MARINE-L-request@JISCMAIL.AC.UK>, "ucam-cog@lists.cam.ac.uk" <ucam-cog@lists.cam.ac.uk>, "aofd_list@nwra.com" <aofd_list@nwra.com>
Date Mon, 17 Sep 2012 17:13:51 +0100

The British Antarctic Survey is inviting applications for a 3-year postdoctoral 
research position to undertake high-resolution model analysis to investigate 
dynamical processes in the Southern Ocean.

This position will contribute to a project funded by the Natural Environment 
Research Council (NERC): Expose (EXport Pathways Out of the Southern ocean and 
the Effect on anthropogenic carbon sequestration). Recent studies have placed a 
particular focus on the Southern Ocean since it has been shown to be a 
substantial sink of anthropogenic carbon: more than 40% of the global oceanic 
inventory of anthropogenic CO2 has entered the ocean south of 40S and is stored 
in mode and intermediate water layers. However, the transport pathways 
exporting water-masses and carbon out of the Southern Ocean are not well 
understood, and have been only analyzed in large-scale averages. Recently, it 
has been demonstrated that these water-masses, which ventilate the Southern 
Hemisphere thermocline and transport carbon are formed and subducted in 
specific regions, but the dynamics and the localisation of these pathways have 
never been studied. This is at odds with the evidence that the export of these 
water-masses has a strong and direct impact on climate and with the evidence 
that mode and intermediate pathways are not well represented in climate models, 
which introduces uncertainty into future predictions. The Expose project will 
provide a new and quantitative understanding these processes and their impacts 
on anthropogenic carbon sequestration.

More information can be found here: 
http://www.antarctica.ac.uk/employment/vacancies/job.php?JobID=762

Informal requests for further information may be addressed to Dr Jean-Baptiste 
Sallée (jbsall@bas.ac.uk).
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