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February 2011
Message 23

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[Met-jobs] PhD Studentship opportunity at the British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge

From "King, John C." <jcki@bas.ac.uk>
To "met-jobs@lists.reading.ac.uk" <met-jobs@lists.reading.ac.uk>
Date Mon, 7 Feb 2011 11:36:27 +0000

NERC PhD studentship at the British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge

INVESTIGATING THE ROLE OF OROGRAPHIC PROCESSES IN CONTROLLING THE CLIMATE OF 
SOUTH GEORGIA

Supervisors: 
Dr John King (BAS, Cambridge) 
Prof. Ian Renfrew (School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia) 

Funding is already secured for this studentship. For more information, see 
http://www.nerc.ac.uk/funding/available/postgrad/awards/, and for eligibility 
see http://www.nerc.ac.uk/funding/available/postgrad/eligibility.asp.

Situated in the South Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean, the mountainous 
island of South Georgia exerts a profound influence on the regional atmospheric 
circulation. Limited meteorological data, and observations of glacial retreat 
on the island indicate that interaction of the prevailing westerly winds with 
the island's high mountains is important in shaping both the mean climate of 
the island and the way in which it responds to large-scale climate change. The 
influence of the island's mountains on the regional atmospheric circulation is 
also potentially an important control on regional ocean circulation, which 
needs to be quantified in order to understand how climate variability impacts 
on the region's highly productive marine ecosystem.

The student will use high-resolution atmospheric models and climate data to 
investigate the processes that control regional atmospheric circulation around 
South Georgia. Case studies will be conducted using the Weather Research and 
Forecasting (WRF) model at  very high (~ 1 km) resolution to study phenomena 
such as orographic gravity wave generation and the development of downslope 
windstorms. The understanding gained from these studies will be put into a 
longer-term context by analysing regional climate data. The outcome of the 
project will be an assessment of the importance of orographic processes in 
controlling recent and future climate change around South Georgia.  

This NERC PhD studentship will be based at the British Antarctic Survey, where 
the student will be working within a group of climate scientists who are using 
climate models and data to study the processes that drive variability and 
change in the polar regions. The student will be registered as an external PhD 
candidate at the University of East Anglia. Currently no fieldwork associated 
with this project is planned. Applicants should hold (or expect to gain) a 
first- or upper-second class honours degree in the physical or environmental 
sciences. As the use of sophisticated numerical models is central to the 
project, candidates should be highly numerate and must be able to demonstrate 
evidence of good computing/IT skills. Please note that only UK citizens are 
eligible to apply for a NERC PhD award.

For further details about the British Antarctic Survey please see: 
http://www.antarctica.ac.uk

Applicants should provide a cover letter, a CV and the e-mails of two referees. 

Closing date for applications: 4th March 2011



Applications and enquiries should be addressed to:

Dr  John King
British Antarctic Survey
High Cross, Madingley Road
Cambridge, CB3 0ET, UK
Email: jcki@bas.ac.uk   

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